Important Difference between a Pin Nailer, Brad Nailer and a Stapler

The adage is “use the right tool for the job”. Before that we’ll actually have to know what the real differences are between all of them. In this case it is difference between a pin nailer, brad nailer and a stapler. There are a lot of different tools at the disposal of a user, but it can also make it quite confusing to know the difference at times, so this list is for everyone out there that is still scratching their head over the exact difference between these tools.

What is a Brad Nailer?

The main difference between a pin nailer, brad nailer and a stapler is in what they “spit out”. A brad nailer runs fine, 18 gauge wire brad nails which are made to be invisible when driven into wood (http://www.nailgundepot.com/blog/whats-the-difference-between-brad-nailers-finish-nailers-blog.html).

The brad nailer may be the most common finishing tool, anyone who wants to do finishing work without pre-drilling or screws would choose to use it, for delicate or fine work. The negative of the brad nails is that it isn’t strong enough to hold heavier objects so that is when something else would be used (http://www.toolstop.co.uk/which-nailer-is-right-for-you-a-toolstop-buying-guide-a1192 ).

What is a Brad Nailer

What is a Brad Nailer

Brad nailers find it difficult to penetrate some hard woods and manufactured woods like plywood though, so that has to be kept in mind too. Most brad nailers are pneumatic but some newer variations are electric with a rechargeable battery pack. The pneumatic version doesn’t use as much compressed air (compared to other nailers) and as a result is quieter and generally quite safe (http://woodworking.about.com/od/pneumatictools/p/How-To-Use-A-Brad-Nailer.htm). Safety precautions should still be taken though, such as wearing safety goggles and keeping loose clothing away.

What is a Pin Nailer?

The pin nailer is generally the least used nail gun. One major difference between the pin nailer and others is that, unlike the brad nailer, its nails do not have heads. This makes it that the tool can shoot these nails into a surface and there is no indication that it is there-even more inconspicuous than the brad nailer (http://woodworkingtoolkit.com/pin-nailer-vs-brad-nailer/). The trade-off though is that the nails have very little holding strength and as such is used to hold up the lightest of objects like mouldings for instance.

What is a Pin Nailer?

What is a Pin Nailer?

Pin nailers are pneumatic but these guns are very quiet and easy to use (with some newer being crdless electric). The nail of a 23 gauge pin nailer is about the same as a sewing needle, to give an idea of the scale of these small and the finesse that is needed when operating the tools

(http://canadianhomeworkshop.com/1411/tips-tools/portable-power-tools/the-pros-of-pin-nailers). A lot of the times glue is used on the pin joints in the wood to add strength to the finished product, though using pin nailers exclusively is a bad idea as it would likely result in the final product coming apart at some point (http://www.familyhandyman.com/tools/air-tools/finish-nailer-tips/view-all).

What is a Stapler

The stapler drives double prong staples into materials instead of the nails of the other two products. As a result of this it has a more sturdy hold and won’t come undone as easily, though it does leave an ugly mark on the wood and has a bigger head, so best not to use on areas that will be seen (http://thecontractorchronicles.com/2014/05/09/difference-pin-nailer-brad-nailer-stapler/). The stapler can be used on harder woods that the bard nailer would struggle with. The stapler can be used for projects outside too because of its strength and lasting power (http://www.doityourself.com/stry/brad-nails-vs-staples).

What is a Stapler

What is a Stapler

The ease of use of the stapler is a great plus point too, as it comes in manual versions also that do not need electricity or air pressure but rather relies on the muscles of the use. It is also used as a home repair tool in many uses-renovating a footstool or replacing the screening on a porch( http://homerepair.about.com/od/toolsmaterialsyouneed/a/staple_gun.htm). Because of its wide range of uses, this is one major difference between a pin nailer, brad nailer and stapler; it has become one of the most widely used tools.

Conclusion:

As can be seen each tool has a pretty specific function to fulfil. In this article I have shown you the important difference between a pin nailer, brad nailer and a stapler. I hope the readers have enjoyed this interesting exploration into the different tools and are better informed if they make a future purchase. If you loved it as much as I did then please share with your friends, family and whomever. Don’t hesitate to leave some of your thoughts in the comments either.

Sources:

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/six-best-uses-for-a-staple-gun

https://mytoolkit.co.uk/blogs/blog/78018373-hints-tips-before-purchasing-a-stapler-or-nailer

http://www.handyguyspodcast.com/857/episode-95-nailguns-for-every-purpose/

 

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My name is James F. Core , and I write this blog. Staple guns are a great tool to have for Your DIY projects that require stapling. I hope this guide to apply the information that you find to make an informed buying decision. Thanks for stopping by.

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